Moneyball

moneyball

I am a big fan of Michael Lewis at this point.

The movie is based on a true story. But having read The Big Short, I think I will go back to this book. I think it will be a compelling read.

Brad Pitt is not the only great actor in this movie. Watch for Jonah Hill. I miss Phillip Seymour Hoffman immensely.

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The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine

The Big Short
Amazon

You want to read a scary story? How about what the events and moments that lead to “Too Big To Fail“?

Michael Lewis was in the finance game before he got out, right before Solomon Brothers failed in 1996. His other more famous career, i.e. writing, gave us the gift of compelling story telling, in this book four heroes with the opportunity of a lifetime: All the things that lead to the financial meltdown in 2008, where they have a chance to cash in big time. The scariest part? It’s all true, with all the details.

Don’t dismiss this as another boring finance world business book. Lewis put most of the complicated concepts in layman’s terms. When you’re done reading it, if you’re not angry, you need to check to see if you have a conscience.

BTW, this book is now a movie, slanted for a Christmas premiere:

A Walk in the Woods

Collider.com

Nice thing about expanding my social life is I get to watch new movies in a theater.

This movie has not adrenaline rush, no octane fueled action. Just a plain story about a writer famous in my eyes, Bill Bryson, venturing out on the Appalachian Trails, and discovered a few things in life.

Mind you, the book he wrote isn’t really the movie. Bill Bryson is very good at studying something he does not know, and describe to his readers, in laymen’s terms, what he learned. On that note, I highly recommend his book A Short History to Nearly Everything.

Margin Call

Credit: Rotten Tomatoes

Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction.

This movie honestly do not need a star-studded cast. The directing is well executed. The story is so bizarre, overacting is going to kill the script. It is how normal and internalized every actor is in this movie that makes the story so chilling, a nightmare, which very unfortunately happened.

Lost on a red mini bus

Credit: Author via Facebook

I’m an old-fashioned girl who usually just read the classics such as Lord of the Rings or Legend of the Condor Heroes (射雕英雄傳), but this novel is really exceptional. It’s been a long time since I devour the readings and wanting to know the ending so badly.

The synopsis is of follows:

A guy decided to go home after karaoke night, and got on a popular mode of transportation in Hong Kong, a red van. At the last stop, he and his fellow passengers realized they are the only ones left in the city. People on the red van are about to find out what really happened to the rest of the city…

I was really into this web novel because I have not seen a well-organized storyline in years. I had little or no faith in what writers can do these days, and this author proved me wrong. The suspense and twists and turns are well done. The story is not just simply a “who done it?” scenario. The author managed to keep me at the edge of my seat all the way to the end, which is a rare gem these days.

I wish this novel can be translated, but it is not only written in Chinese, but in colloquial Cantonese, or more specifically, words that are mostly spoken by young Hong Kongers today. However, I believe the plot can be easily converted into an American version. The movie is getting a lot of buzz, with the only hope I have is that the director kept most of the important elements from the novel.

Watch this space for any news of new movie or novel versions.

Buddha’s Palms

credit: http://www.tpwang.net

Yeah, we’re getting to the weird territory of me watching really old movies.

Buddha’s Palms was made in 1960. The special effects are overlapped and exposed with the film, frame by frame. As cheesy as the movie looks in 2013, it is the most awesome special effects Hong Kong movie at the time. The amount of innovation and unlimited imagination can be seen on every frame of this film.

Don’t take my word for it. Watch it on johnmatthewtsang‘s playlist on YouTube.